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Vasectomy - A Bold Step towards a Carefree Future

Vasectomy is a surgical procedure for male sterilization. It is meant to protect permanently against pregnancy, so it is super effective.

What is a vasectomy?

A vasectomy is a simple surgery done by a doctor in an office, hospital, or clinic. The small tubes in your scrotum that carry sperm are cut or blocked off, so sperm can’t leave your body and cause pregnancy. The procedure is quick, and you can go home the same day. And it’s highly effective at preventing pregnancy — almost 100%.

There are two types of vasectomies: the incision method and the no-scalpel (no-cut) method. No-cut methods lower the risk of infection and other complications and generally take less time to heal.

Vasectomies are meant to be permanent, so they usually can’t be reversed. You should only get a vasectomy if you are 100% positive you don’t want to be able to get someone pregnant for the rest of your life.

The term “vasectomy” comes from the name of the tubes (Vas Deferens) in your scrotum that are blocked during the procedure.

How does a vasectomy work?

Sperm cells are microscopic cells that join up with an egg to cause pregnancy. Sperm cells are made in your testicles. Sperm leaves the testicles through two tubes called the vas deferens and mixes with other fluids to make semen (cum). The sperm in your semen can cause pregnancy if it gets into a vagina.

A vasectomy blocks or cuts each vas deferens tube, keeping sperm out of your semen. Sperm cells stay in your testicles and are absorbed by your body. Starting at least 2 months after a vasectomy, your semen (cum) won’t contain any sperm, so it can’t cause pregnancy. You must have your semen tested 8-16 weeks after your vasectomy to make sure there’s no sperm in your semen.

After your vasectomy, your semen (cum) will still look, feel, and taste the same. You’d have to look at it under a microscope to see a difference. You still have the same amount of semen you did before — there won’t be sperm in it, so you can’t get anybody pregnant. Vasectomies don’t change the way having an orgasm or ejaculating (cumming) feels, and they don’t impact your hormone levels, sex drive, or ability to get an erection (get complicated).

Can a vasectomy be reversed?

Vasectomies are meant to be permanent, so they can’t always be undone.

It’s sometimes possible to reverse a vasectomy, but there are no guarantees that your fertility will not come back. Vasectomy reversal is a complicated surgery, and it can be costly.

Whether or not a vasectomy reversal might work depends on:

  • How long ago did you get the vasectomy?
  • The type of vasectomy you got.
  • The kind of reversal procedure you get and the skill of the doctor.

If you’re worried about reversal when thinking about getting a vasectomy, it’s probably best to hold off.

Before you get a vasectomy, think about any possible life changes that could affect you in the future, like a divorce, a new partner, or the death of a child. You don’t need your partner’s permission to have a vasectomy, but it may be helpful to talk about it with your partner (or anyone else who could offer support and advice).

There are other ways to prevent pregnancy that are not permanent, like condoms, outercourse, and withdrawal. And your partner has lots of birth control options, too. IUDs and implants are nearly as effective as vasectomies and last for a long time, but they are not permanent.

Is a vasectomy effective?

A vasectomy is one of the most effective kinds of birth control out there and the most effective method for people with penises and testicles. Vasectomies are almost 100% effective at preventing pregnancy, but not right away. It takes at least 2 months for your semen to become sperm-free.

8-16 weeks after your vasectomy, your doctor will do a simple test called a semen analysis to check for sperm in your semen. Make sure that you ejaculate (cum) at least 20 times before you have your semen tested. For the test, you’ll masturbate into a cup or use a special condom when you have sex to collect a semen sample. Your doctor will tell you when there’s no sperm in your semen, and the vasectomy is working as birth control. Don’t have unprotected sex until your doctor says it’s safe.

A vasectomy is effective because it’s designed to be permanent, and you can’t forget to use it or mess it up. It prevents pregnancy round the clock for the rest of your life. So once your doctor says there’s no longer sperm in your semen, that’s pretty much it — you don’t have to do anything else to prevent pregnancy. Vasectomies are get-it and forget-it birth control.

There’s a very slight chance that the cut ends of your vas deferens can grow back together after a vasectomy, which means you could cause a pregnancy. But this is super rare.

Do vasectomies protect you from STDs?

No, a vasectomy won’t protect you or your partners from sexually transmitted infections. Semen (cum) can still carry STDs, even if it doesn’t contain sperm. And for some STDs, all you need is skin-to-skin contact to get them from someone. Use condoms to lower your chances of getting or spreading STDs.

How safe is a vasectomy?

Vasectomies are incredibly safe for most people, but all medical procedures have some risks. Vasectomies are meant to be permanent, so they usually can not be reversed. Vasectomies are super safe, and very few people have complications. But, like all medical procedures, there are some possible risks. The most common risks with a vasectomy are minor and treatable.

Can I get a vasectomy?

Most people with penises and testicles can safely get a vasectomy. Your doctor will talk with you about your health to make sure a vasectomy is right for you.

You should only get a vasectomy if you are sure you don’t want to be able to have kids for the rest of your life.

A vasectomy may not be a good choice for you if:

  • You may want to have a child biologically in the future.
  • Your partner, friends, or family are pressuring you.
  • You hope a vasectomy will solve problems that may be temporary — such as marriage or sexual problems, short-term mental or physical illnesses, financial worries, or being out of work.

What are the risks of a vasectomy?

Getting a vasectomy is usually really safe. But, like all medical procedures, there can be some risks. Things like temporary pain, bruising, and infection are the most common ones. You may need an antibiotic from your doctor to treat a disease.

Call your doctor if you get a vasectomy and have any of these signs of infection:

  • A fever over 100° F.
  • Blood or pus coming from where the cut was made in your scrotum.
  • Lots of pain or swelling in your scrotum or testicle area.

Other possible problems with vasectomies include:

  • Bleeding where the skin was cut (but this usually stops on its own).
  • Bleeding under the skin may cause swelling or bruising (called hematoma). It usually goes away on its own. Putting ice packs on the bruise and taking over-the-counter pain medication can help.
  • Swelling (called Spermatic Granuloma) is caused by sperm leaking from your vas deferens. It usually goes away independently, but a doctor may need to drain it.
  • Temporary pain or discomfort is joint. You can take over-the-counter pain medicine and wear supportive underwear that doesn’t let your testicles hang. Long-term pain is uncommon but possible. If this happens, you should discuss potential treatment with a doctor or nurse.

Very rarely, the cut ends of your vas deferens grow back together, which can allow pregnancy to happen.

What can I expect during and after having a vasectomy?

A vasectomy is a straightforward surgical procedure. It’s swift, and you can go home right after. You’ll need to rest for a couple of days after the vasectomy.

Does getting a vasectomy hurt?

Probably not. Your doctor will help make your vasectomy as comfortable as possible. You’ll get local anesthesia to numb your testicles, so you shouldn’t feel much during the procedure. You may also get medicine to help you relax.

You may be slightly uncomfortable when you get the numbing shot or when the vas deferens tubes are handled during the procedure. But overall, you shouldn’t feel too much pain.

There are two types of vasectomies: one that requires an incision (a cut in your skin) and one that’s incision-free (no scalpel or no cut).

What happens during an incision vasectomy?

The doctor makes one or two minor cuts in the skin of your scrotum. Through these cuts, the tubes that carry sperm (vas deferens) are blocked off. Sometimes, a tiny part of each tube is removed. The tubes may be tied, blocked with surgical clips, or closed with an electrical current (this is called cauterizing). The whole thing takes about 20 minutes, and the cut is stitched.

What happens during a no-scalpel vasectomy?

The doctor makes one tiny puncture (hole) to reach both vas deferens tubes — the skin of your scrotum isn’t cut with a scalpel. Your tubes are then tied off, cauterized, or blocked. The small puncture heals quickly. You won’t need stitches, and there’s no scarring.

No-scalpel Vasectomy methods, also called no-cut or no-incision, reduce bleeding and lower the risk of infection, bruising, and other complications.

How will I feel after my vasectomy?

You can go home and rest right after your vasectomy. You may feel some discomfort or pain after your vasectomy, but you shouldn’t be in terrible pain. You may also have bruising and swelling for a few days.

After your vasectomy:

  • Wear snug underwear that doesn’t let your testicles move too much to help with pain.
  • Take over-the-counter pain medicine (like ibuprofen) to help with pain and swelling.
  • Ice your genitals as needed on and off for the first 24 hours to help with pain and swelling.
  • Don’t swim or take a bath for 2 days.
  • Don’t do any hard physical work or exercise for 1 week.
  • Don’t have any sex or masturbate for 1 week.

 

Call your doctor if you have

 

  • A fever over 100° F.
  • Blood or pus coming from where the doctor cut your scrotum.
  • Lots of pain or swelling in your scrotum or testicle area.

These signs could mean you have an infection and need antibiotics.

How long will it take me to recover after my vasectomy?

Most people only need to rest for a few days after their vasectomy. You must take about a week off if your job is physically demanding. It would help if you didn’t exercise or do any hard physical work for about a week after your vasectomy.

How soon can I have sex after my vasectomy?

You can have sex a week after your vasectomy. Some people wait longer. If having sex hurts or feels uncomfortable, stop and wait a few more days. Just remember that the vasectomy doesn’t prevent pregnancy right away, so make sure to use another method of birth control.

It takes at least 2 months after your vasectomy for your semen to be sperm-free. Your doctor will test your semen 8-16 weeks after your vasectomy and tell you when the sperm is gone and if the vasectomy is working as birth control. Make sure to ejaculate (cum) at least 20 times before you have your semen tested.

To collect a semen sample, you’ll masturbate into a cup or use a special condom when you have sex. Until your doctor says there’s no sperm in your semen, use condoms or another form of birth control during vaginal sex.

How do I get a vasectomy?

Many urologic-specialists health centers, hospitals, private doctors, and clinics do vasectomies. You may be able to get your vasectomy for free or at a low cost.

How much does a vasectomy cost?

Getting a vasectomy can cost anywhere between $0 and $1,000, including follow-up visits.

The cost of a vasectomy varies and depends on where you get it, what kind you get, and whether or not you have health insurance that will cover some or all of the cost. Vasectomies may be free (or low cost) with some health insurance plans, Medicaid, and other government programs.

Even if your vasectomy costs more than other methods up front, it usually ends up saving you money in the long run because it lasts forever. Vasectomies are about 6 times cheaper than female sterilization.

Can I get a vasectomy for free or at a low cost?

Under the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), most insurance plans must cover birth control with no out-of-pocket cost to you. This policy does NOT include vasectomies, but many insurance plans cover some or all of the cost of vasectomies anyway.

If you don’t have health insurance, you still have options. Depending on your income and legal status in the U.S., you may be able to sign up for Medicaid or other state programs that can help you pay for birth control and other health care.

Urologic specialists work to provide you with the services you need, whether or not you have insurance. Most urologic-specialist health centers accept Medicaid and health insurance, and many charge less for services depending on your income. Other clinics and doctors that provide vasectomies may also use a sliding scale based on your income.

If you’re worried about cost, check with your local urologic-specialists health center to find out if they can hook you up with a vasectomy within your budget. Urologic specialists can also help you get health insurance.

What are the benefits of vasectomy?

A vasectomy in Indiana Marville is practical, convenient, and permanent birth control. It takes the stress of preventing pregnancy off your partner and can even make your sex life better.

Vasectomies are Very effective.

Vasectomies are permanent and one of the most effective kinds of birth control out there, which are more than 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. A vasectomy is effective because it’s designed to be permanent, and there’s no way you can mess it up or use it the wrong way. Vasectomies prevent pregnancy 24/7 for the rest of your life.

Vasectomies are super convenient.

Once you have a vasectomy and your doctor says there’s no longer any sperm in your semen, that’s pretty much it; you and your partner don’t have to do anything else to prevent pregnancy. No trips to the pharmacy, nothing to buy or use, nothing to put in place before sex. Vasectomies are get-it-and-forget-it birth control.

Vasectomy Makes sex life Better.

A vasectomy is birth control that you don’t have to pay attention to during sex so that it won’t interfere with the action. You can get caught up in the heat of the moment without worrying about pregnancy.

Vasectomy doesn’t mess with your hormones or sex drive. It won’t change the way having an orgasm or ejaculating (cumming) feels. Your semen (cum) will still look, feel, and taste the same after a vasectomy; it just can’t get anybody pregnant.

A vasectomy takes the burden of preventing pregnancy off your partner, which can strengthen your relationship and make intimacy more enjoyable for them, too. Sex can get better and more spontaneous when you and your partner can focus on each other instead of birth control.

What are the disadvantages of getting a vasectomy?

A vasectomy is designed to be permanent, so you can’t change your mind later. And, like all medical procedures, vasectomies have some risks.

Vasectomies are permanent

Vasectomies are meant to be permanent. Even if you get your vasectomy reversed, your fertility may never come back. Vasectomy reversal surgery is complicated and expensive and doesn’t always work. So, you should only get a vasectomy if you’re sure you don’t want to get someone pregnant for the rest of your life. Read more about vasectomy reversal.

Vasectomies can have some risks.

Overall, vasectomies are very safe, and most people don’t have any problems. However, all medical procedures have some possible risks. The most common risk with a vasectomy is infection, but those are usually minor and treatable with antibiotics. After the process, you may also have pain, bleeding, bruising, or swelling. Read more about vasectomy safety.

Vasectomy doesn’t prevent STDs

A vasectomy doesn’t prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections. Semen (cum) can still carry STDs, even if it doesn’t contain sperm. The best way to protect yourself and your partner from STDs is to get tested regularly and use condoms.

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